Park Path Completion - January 2011

Landscape Upgrades
 
January 2011
 
With the completion of a pedestrian path that now completely encircles El Quito Park (the front section along Paseo Prasada was completed earlier this year); the next phase of the project is to address the landscaping component for the north and west side of the park - to better match the newly renovated front section of the park.  This project will add an assortment of different trees adjacent to the path along the back of the park, and along the side of the park backing up to the Primary Plus School.  In addition, approximately 9 new planting beds will be added to this area, planted with ornamental scrubs, roses, perennial flowers, and ornamental grasses.  The existing turf grass in this area will be removed, and irrigation lines will be altered to accommodate the new landscape configuration.  Landscape bark will be used to mulch the new trees and planting beds parallel to the existing path, similar to the new configuration at the front of the park.

Not only will this project greatly enhance the beauty of the park, but it will also reduce water, fertilizer, and chemical use in the park.  Mower emissions and fuel use will be reduced as well by eliminating the turf grass in the “outer circle” areas of the park (where it serves minimal use).  Movement of irrigation lines and sprinklers away from the pedestrian path will also help eliminate the “water pooling” issues that we have had with the back section of the path, closest to Parkside. 

Upon completion of this final section, there will no longer be any turf grass on the outside parameters of the park; ornamental landscape plants and trees will then occupy these areas.  These changes will not have any impact on the existing inner turf (playing field) areas of the park or the baseball diamond area.  The project is scheduled take place over the winter months to minimize disruption to park users, and to add the new plants and trees to the area in the winter or early spring months (to minimize transplant shock).

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